Making Seed Balls to Help Birds

Seed Balls are a fun activity with kids. And an easy way to color up your way to school or abandoned places. At the same time you’ll improve habitat for bugs, bees, and birds alike.

You should spend a little time on researching the place you want to beautify. Particular on how sunny respectively shady it is. Accordingly select your seeds. Most preferable from plants which would naturally live here and are not imported from far away countries!

Ingredients:

Clay

Clay helps retain moisture as the seeds germinate and provides a protective outer layer from wind, hungry birds, and the harsh midday sun. Soil and seeds can be mixed right into potter’s or artist’s clay without adding water.Refined clay powder, or unscented clay kitty litter require the addition of water to bring everything together.

Organic seed-starting soil

Seed-starting soil or fine compost provides seedlings with nutrients until their roots manage to break into the earth.

Native wildflower seeds

Make sure to choose seeds of plants that are native to your area.

If you have not collected the seeds before yourself (last year …) and have to by some seed packages, ideal growing conditions are often listed on the seed packet. So be sure to plant your seed balls in a location that will give them the best chance of success.

Instructions

Makes 12 seed balls

• Mix 1/2 cup clay with 1/2 cup of compost

If you use clay powder, add 1/3 cup of water and stir. If the mixture is too wet, add a little more compost. If it’s too dry, add little more water. Otherwise test first, if you need water at all. Aim for a “cookie dough” consistency.

• Flatten a spoonful of the dough on your palm and add a pinch of native seed mix.

• Pinch closed and roll into a ball. If you’re planting on a hill, flatten one side of the seed ball so it doesn’t roll away!

• Place on a piece of cardboard and allow to dry for at least three hours, or even a few days depending on conditions. You’ll know they’re done when they feel hard and dry to the touch.

Now go out and place or throw your seed balls. Most success is promised, if you also keep an eye on the weather. Short before rain comes works best.

Related Posts

Making Seed Balls to Help Birds

Seed Balls are a fun activity with kids. And an easy way to color up your way to school or abandoned places. At the same time you’ll improve habitat for bugs, bees, and birds alike.

You should spend a little time on researching the place you want to beautify. Particular on how sunny respectively shady it is. Accordingly select your seeds. Most preferable from plants which would naturally live here and are not imported from far away countries!

Ingredients:

Clay

Clay helps retain moisture as the seeds germinate and provides a protective outer layer from wind, hungry birds, and the harsh midday sun. Soil and seeds can be mixed right into potter’s or artist’s clay without adding water.Refined clay powder, or unscented clay kitty litter require the addition of water to bring everything together.

Organic seed-starting soil

Seed-starting soil or fine compost provides seedlings with nutrients until their roots manage to break into the earth.

Native wildflower seeds

Make sure to choose seeds of plants that are native to your area.

If you have not collected the seeds before yourself (last year …) and have to by some seed packages, ideal growing conditions are often listed on the seed packet. So be sure to plant your seed balls in a location that will give them the best chance of success.

Instructions

Makes 12 seed balls

• Mix 1/2 cup clay with 1/2 cup of compost

If you use clay powder, add 1/3 cup of water and stir. If the mixture is too wet, add a little more compost. If it’s too dry, add little more water. Otherwise test first, if you need water at all. Aim for a “cookie dough” consistency.

• Flatten a spoonful of the dough on your palm and add a pinch of native seed mix.

• Pinch closed and roll into a ball. If you’re planting on a hill, flatten one side of the seed ball so it doesn’t roll away!

• Place on a piece of cardboard and allow to dry for at least three hours, or even a few days depending on conditions. You’ll know they’re done when they feel hard and dry to the touch.

Now go out and place or throw your seed balls. Most success is promised, if you also keep an eye on the weather. Short before rain comes works best.

Related Posts